Dealing with Honeybee Stings

During the summer months, you will find that many bees are taking advantage of the bountiful assortment of bloomed flowers. There are thousands of different be types within the world and can found in a wide variation of colors. The most well-known bee within the United States is the honeybee.

Though the honey bee is very prevalent within the United States, it isn’t native to the Americas. The honey bee migrated to North America in the mid-17th century with the help of European travelers. They have become very beneficial in the growing cycle of our plant life.

Honey Bee Stings

When a honey bee stings it will do so out of self-defense. As a honey bee stings, it’s stinger becomes detached and ultimately leads to the death of the insect. This is different from bumblebees and wasps that can sting repeatedly.

When stung by a honey bee, removal of the stinger should be the first priority at all times. Generally, the sting will feel similar to getting a shot at a doctor’s office. Some allergies can cause severe allergic reactions and a physician should be contacted immediately if the stung individual has difficulty breathing, dizziness, nausea, the development of hives or tightness in the throat.

There have been many spirited debates on the proper method of removing the stinger but the key is making sure its removed. Some will say to scrape the stinger out to avoid more poison being pushed into the wound, others will pull it out with a pair of tweezers or another object. Once the stinger is removed, the affected site should be thoroughly cleaned.

Cleaning the affected site should be done immediately after the stinger has been removed. This can easily be done by applying soap and water to the sting location. To help deal with swelling and pain, ice can be applied to the area. If a doctor is consulted and no allergic reactions are present, they will most often recommend taking a pain reliever and antihistamine to control symptoms.

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